Poinsettia – Indoor House Plants

Poinsettia - Indoor House Plants

Poinsettia is a very popular indoor plant for the holiday season. It is a shrub or small tree, typically reaching a height of 2–13 ft. The plant bears dark green dentate leaves that measure 7–16 centimeters in length. The colored bracts which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colors, but are actually leaves. The poinsettia is not a poisonous plant.

Scientific Name: Euphorbia pulcherrima
Common Name: Poinsettia

Poinsettia - Indoor House Plants

How to grow and maintain Poinsettia:

Light:
Place your poinsettia in a bright area so that it gets at least 6 hours of bright, indirect sunlight each day. Placing it in direct sunlight may fade the color of the bracts. If the direct sun cannot be avoided, filter the sunlight with light shade or sheer curtain.

Soil:
Prepare a container full of well-draining potting mix. Poinsettias should be grown in soil with a slightly acid pH 6.5.

Water:
Water your poinsettia with a watering can until the water slightly leaks from the container’s drain holes. Periodically check the soil’s surface for dryness, it needs moist soil for the best growth.

Temperature:
When plants are in bloom, it is important to maintain 65-75 degrees during the day. Poinsettias are particularly sensitive about temperature and should not be placed near windows. Limit their exposure to drafty windows and doors.

Fertilizer:
Use liquid fertilizer monthly during the late spring through summer. Do not fertilize during the winter.

Propagation:
Propagate the Euphorbia pulcherrima plant with stem cuttings at the beginning of summer and use rooting hormone.

Pests and Diseases:
Most of the problems in poinsettia are foliar diseases, which include powdery mildew, Phytophthora blight, and botrytis gray mold. When it comes to pests, on the other hand, some of the most common that causes infestation include fungus gnats, whiteflies, and thrips.

Last updated on May 18th, 2019

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