Begonia masoniana (Iron cross begonia)

Begonia masoniana

Begonia masoniana (Iron cross begonia) is a perennial, rhizomatous indoor house plant and can grow up to 20 inches tall. It has large, asymmetrical, heavily textured green leaves covered in reddish hairs, with a prominent dark brown pattern in the center of each leaf, reminiscent of the German Iron Cross. It creates small pinkish-white or pale green flowers appear in spring and summer, but these blossoms are insignificant compared to the magnificent foliage.

Scientific Name: Begonia masoniana
Common Name: Iron cross begonia

Begonia masoniana (Iron cross begonia)

How to care and grow Begonia masoniana (Iron cross begonia)?

Light:

It grows well in bright indirect sunlight originating from a south, east or west window. It also thrives under fluorescent lights.

Soil:

It requires a well-drained, peat moss based soil, such as African violet potting mix.

Water:

Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but never allow your plant to sit in water. You can allow the top 1 inch of soil to dry out between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:

Begonia masoniana prefers an average room temperature of 65 – 75 degrees Fahrenheit / 18 – 24 degrees Celsius. Iron cross begonia is not cold-tolerant and can be harmed by temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit / 13 degrees Celsius.

Fertilizer:

Fertilize monthly with a 10-10-5 liquid compost diluted by half. Fertilize when the soil is already moist to avoid fertilizer burn. Do not feed your plant during the dormant period.

Propagation:

Begonia masoniana can be easily propagated by stem cuttings or leaf cuttings. Take three inches to stem cuttings with leaves in early summer and root them in a moist, sterile potting blend. Cover with plastic or a glass cloche to raise the humidity around it until new leaves form.

Pests and Diseases:

There is no serious pest or disease problems. Iron cross begonia is susceptible to attacks from spider mites, mealybugs, and aphids.

Last updated on August 9th, 2021

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1 × 5 =