Plectranthus verticillatus (Swedish ivy)

Plectranthus verticillatus (Swedish ivy)

Plectranthus verticillatus (Swedish ivy) is one of the easiest plants to grow indoors or out. It is a prostrate evergreen perennial forming a mat to 10cm tall, with rounded, coarsely toothed leaves purple beneath, and free spikes of purple-dotted, small white flowers in a stem about 2 to 3 inches long. This plant is very showy in hanging baskets. It is great for beginner gardeners and those that like low maintenance gardens.

Scientific Name: Plectranthus verticillatus
Common Name: Swedish ivy, Swedish begonia or whorled plectranthus.

 Plectranthus verticillatus (Swedish ivy) - Indoor plant

How to care and grow Plectranthus verticillatus (Swedish ivy)?

Light:

Bright indirect light, ideally sunlight but will also tolerate some artificial lighting. Place in bright light near a sunny window. Eastern windows that provide strong morning light during the summer months are ideal.

Water:

Keep soil moist but not soggy. Reduce watering in winter when development is slow. Leaf will stain and turn light green to yellow. Reduce watering when this occurs.

Temperature:

Keep temperatures between 70-75 degrees during most of the year. During the winter, 60-65 degrees are best for the plant. This plant can tolerate lower temperatures of 40 degrees for short periods of time without damage.

Fertilizer:

Apply water-soluble compost on a three-week plan during active growth in spring and summer. When plant development slows, maintain a schedule of half-strength fertilizer once a month.

Propagation:

Plectranthus verticillatus is very easy to propagate. Propagate by seed at 19-24°C (19-24°F) when ripe or propagate by stem-tip cuttings at any time of year.

Pruning:

Some could benefit from an occasional light pruning once every year to keep up a manageable shape and size.

Repotting:

Keep plant root bound. Do not re-pot until the roots have filled its current pot.

Pests and diseases:

No serious insect or disease problems. Look for mealybugs and spider mites. Leaf spots and root rot may occur.

Last updated on August 15th, 2021

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