Trachycarpus fortunei – Indoor House Plants

Trachycarpus fortunei - Indoor House Plants

Trachycarpus fortunei is commonly known as windmill palm. It is very easy to grow and maintain. It is ideal for keeping both indoors and outdoors, the palm is hardy to -10℃. The windmill is slow growing palm that can reach 10 – 20 ft in tallness and 5-10 ft wide. Green fan-shaped leaves have a silvery appearance. The bark is secured with a decorative mat of loose fibers. In the early summer Windmill, Palm produces large plumes of yellow flowers on the male plants and greenish on the female plants. Blossoms are held on 3ft long branched stalks. Later blossoms of the female plants transform into bluish-black fruits that are about 1/2 inch in diameter. The fruits get ripe in the mid-fall. The Windmill Palm fruit is not edible.

Scientific Name: Trachycarpus fortunei
Common Names: Chinese windmill palm, windmill palm or Chusan palm.

Trachycarpus fortunei - Indoor House Plants

 

 

 

 

 

How to grow and maintain Trachycarpus fortunei:

Light:
It prefers to grow well in full sun to partial sun.

Soil:
It likes to grow in any well-drained, fertile soil. the soil ph Level is between 6.1-7.8.

Temperature:
Keep the windmill palm plant a 65 to 80ᵒF. however, it can tolerate 10ᵒF (-12ᵒC) without damage.

Water:
Water moderately throughout the growing season, but sparingly in cooler temperatures. Do not over water. Water them in well in the garden. Let top 3 to 4 inches of soil dry out before each watering. In pots, water the plants thoroughly letting the excess water drain through the bottom of the pot.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every 3 to 4 months to avoid over fertilization which could cause the roots to burn.

Propagation:
It can be propagated by seeds. Windmill palm seeds will grow in 8 to 12 weeks without a lot of fuss. Sow seed at 75°F in spring or fall.

Pests and Diseases:
Scales and palm aphids are pests that normally cause issues for Windmill Palm. Windmill Palm may be infected by root rot, moderately susceptible to lethal yellowing disease, and leaf spots.

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